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November 14, 2008

Comments

I love that you rescued Miss Padma. She looks right at home on the meditation cushions.

I too rescued a little pregant white cat this spring. Mercedes survived all winter outside in Toronto, but was happy to come inside and have her 4 kittens.

I can relate to the attachment issues also - I found homes for two of the four kittens, but it looks like the other two are staying with me and their Mama.

Just don't separate them too early...
We have 'fostered' mommy cats and fresh kittens, to give them time to socialize before the kittens are able to be adopted. It's so fun, but yes, very hard to let go!

I agree with Carol of Seattle - kittens need at least 8 weeks with Mum, and 12 weeks is even better.

The two I kept were still "nursing" when they were 5 months old! Even though Mum didn't have milk any more. (and she was getting rather fed up with it!)

Yes, as you can imagine, catz iz good therapy for the long Mongolian winter (-4F as I type) and I'm in no rush to separate them. Also, a kitten's birth and growth give me ongoing blog material!

Oh, my, it's a shame that your cats live with such hardship.

I've been looking forward to asking one of my students about Mongolia, where he lived for four years. Now that his English is cenversational, he was able to tell me that, on one hand, if you leave a quarter outside overnight, you have a block of ice in the morning: on the bright side, you can take a four-hour horseride through the desert with a guide for about nine bucks.
Funny little kid -- not my most studious, but he has an interesting relationship with drawing and with music. I often catch him creating his own symphony with a tapping pen, a whistling pen cap, a scraping ruler, etc. I can't always understand his written stories except that he illustrates them with quite a bit of humor.

I definitely need a recap on ultimate reality too...

Your mother is right on the target and it makes me rejoice as well.

Makes me wonder Where little Paddy is going to give birth, maybe in an auspicious place. Don't worry, they're pretty good at cleaning up after themselves! I'll bet good money she's hiding more than one, though!

I would also be interested in your exposition of ultimate reality. Do please blog it and don't keep it exclusively for Ma!

Wow -4! no wonder Miss Padma is looking so smug on her cushions. It must be a big relief for her to know she's got a safe warm place to have her kitten.

I enjoy your blog so much, but I'm really looking forward to lots of kitten blogs.

Forgot to add -- whatever those bizarre events are, I wish you the best.

This just in -- it's off-topic but hardly irrelevant, it seems. According to a prophecy given to Terton Dudjom Lingpa (d. 1902) by Yeshe Tsogyal in a vision (a complete description of which is in the volume of Troma Nagmo texts from Dudjom Lingpa's works), and I paraphrase: "In the future, due to the disinterrment of effigies used by Guru Rinpoche to bind the Nine Brothers (?), those demons will pose as people with high attainments on the Buddhist path; they will distribute weapons technology (mtshon gyi 'phrul 'khor dgyed)".

Now this sounds not unlike a well-known, extremely clever scoundrel of recent infamy, does it not? The one who sold a classified weapons technology in Southeast Asia... the knife collector and knife-fighting afficionado, doesn't it?

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Mongolia Bird List: "L" = Lifer

  • Amur Falcon -- L
  • Arctic (Hoary) Redpoll -- L
  • Arctic Warbler -- L
  • Asian Brown Flycatcher -- L
  • Asian Dowitcher -- L
  • Asian Short-toed Lark -- L
  • Azure Tit -- L
  • Bank Swallow
  • Bar-headed Goose -- L
  • Barn Swallow
  • Bean Goose -- L
  • Black Grouse -- L
  • Black Stork -- L
  • Black Woodpecker -- L
  • Black-billed Magpie
  • Black-eared Kite -- L
  • Black-headed Gull -- L
  • Black-tailed Godwit -- L
  • Black-winged Stilt
  • Blyth's Pipit -- L
  • Bohemian Waxwing -- L
  • Booted Eagle -- L
  • Brown Shrike -- L
  • Carrion Crow
  • Chinese Penduline Tit -- L
  • Chukar -- L
  • Cinereous Vulture
  • Citrine Wagtail -- L
  • Coal Tit
  • Common Cuckoo
  • Common Goldeneye
  • Common Greenshank -- L
  • Common Kestrel
  • Common Merganser
  • Common Pochard -- L
  • Common Raven
  • Common Redpoll
  • Common Redshank -- L
  • Common Rosefinch -- L
  • Common Sandpiper
  • Common Shelduck -- L
  • Common Snipe -- L
  • Common Starling
  • Common Swift
  • Common Tern
  • Crested Lark -- L
  • Curlew Sandpiper -- L
  • Dark-throated Thrush -- L
  • Daurian Jackdaw -- L
  • Daurian Partridge -- L
  • Daurian Redstart -- L
  • Demoiselle Crane -- L
  • Desert Warbler -- L
  • Desert Wheatear -- L
  • Dusky Thrush -- L
  • Dusky Warbler -- L
  • Eared Grebe
  • Eurasian Bullfinch -- L
  • Eurasian Coot -- L
  • Eurasian Curlew -- L
  • Eurasian Griffon
  • Eurasian Hobby
  • Eurasian Jay
  • Eurasian Nutcracker -- L
  • Eurasian Nuthatch -- L
  • Eurasian Skylark
  • Eurasian Sparrowhawk
  • Eurasian Spoonbill -- L
  • Eurasian Three-toed Woodpecker -- L
  • Eurasian Tree Sparrow
  • Eurasian Treecreeper -- L
  • Eurasian Wigeon -- L
  • Eurasian Wryneck -- L
  • Eyebrowed Thrush -- L
  • Falcated Duck -- L
  • Fork-tailed Swift -- L
  • Gadwall
  • Garganey -- L
  • Godlewski's Bunting -- L
  • Goldcrest -- L
  • Golden Eagle
  • Gray Heron
  • Gray Wagtail -- L
  • Great Cormorant
  • Great Crested Grebe
  • Great Gray Shrike -- L
  • Great Spotted Woodpecker
  • Great Tit
  • Greater Short-toed Lark -- L
  • Greater Spotted Eagle -- L
  • Green Sandpiper -- L
  • Green-winged Teal
  • Greenish Warbler -- L
  • Hawfinch -- L
  • Hazel Grouse -- L
  • Hen/Northern Harrier
  • Herring Gull
  • Hill Pigeon -- L
  • Hoopoe
  • Horned Grebe
  • Horned Lark
  • House Sparrow
  • Isabelline Shrike -- L
  • Isabelline Wheatear -- L
  • Kentish (Snowy) Plover -- L
  • Lesser Spotted Woodpecker -- L
  • Lesser Whitethroat -- L
  • Little Bunting -- L
  • Little Owl -- L
  • Little Ringed Plover
  • Long-tailed Rosefinch
  • Long-tailed Tit
  • Long-toed Stint -- L
  • Mallard
  • Marsh Sandpiper
  • Meadow Bunting -- L
  • Mew Gull -- L
  • Mongolian Finch -- L
  • Mongolian Ground-jay -- L
  • Mongolian Lark -- L
  • Northern Lapwing -- L
  • Northern Pintail
  • Northern Shoveler
  • Northern Wheatear
  • Olive-backed Pipit -- L
  • Oriental Plover -- L
  • Oriental Reed Warbler -- L
  • Oriental Turtle Dove
  • Pacific Golden-plover -- L
  • Paddyfield Warbler -- L
  • Pallas' Reed Bunting -- L
  • Pallas's Leaf Warbler -- L
  • Pallas's Sandgrouse -- L
  • Peregrine Falcon
  • Pied Avocet -- L
  • Pied Wheatear -- L
  • Pine Bunting -- L
  • Pine Grosbeak -- L
  • Pintail Snipe -- L
  • Red (Common) Crossbill
  • Red-billed Chough -- L
  • Red-crested Pochard -- L
  • Red-flanked Bluetail -- L
  • Red-necked Grebe
  • Red-throated Flycatcher -- L
  • Richard's Pipit -- L
  • Rock Dove
  • Rock Sparrow -- L
  • Rook -- L
  • Ruddy Shelduck -- L
  • Ruddy Turnstone
  • Ruff -- L
  • Rufous-tailed Robin -- L
  • Saker Falcon -- L
  • Scaly Thrush -- L
  • Sharp-tailed Sandpiper -- L
  • Siberian Accentor -- L
  • Siberian Rubythroat -- L
  • Smew -- L
  • Spotted Flycatcher -- L
  • Spotted Redshank -- L
  • Steppe Eagle -- L
  • Swan Goose -- L
  • Temminck's Stint -- L
  • Thick-billed Warbler -- L
  • Tree Pipit -- L
  • Tufted Duck -- L
  • Twite -- L
  • Upland Buzzard -- L
  • Ural Owl -- L
  • Water Pipit -- L
  • White Wagtail
  • White-cheeked Starling -- L
  • White-naped Crane -- L
  • White-winged (Two-barred) Crossbill -- L
  • White-winged Scoter
  • White-winged Tern -- L
  • Whooper Swan -- L
  • Willow Tit -- L
  • Wood Sandpiper -- L
  • Yellow-billed Grosbeak -- L
  • Yellow-browed (Inornate) Warbler -- L