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January 03, 2009

Comments

I don't think you need to consider karma here. I don't have time now to check for the exact reference, but one sutta about karma explains what karma is not and biology is one of them. Others are, from memory: meteorology, space and geography (the four continents and Mount Meru).

Additionally, there is commonly a lot of misunderstandings about evolution and natural selection. For instance, a species does not disappear to give birth to another. Also, as often insisted upon by late Stephen Jay Gould, catastrophies played a major role in selecting the species. Sometimes, the animals which look "ancient" are simply the ones who survived. In fact, all these "new" animals are weird since they have been around for a very very short period of time.

The youngest and weirdest of all, of course, is the so-called human being.

With a look similar to the triops, you can check out the horseshoe crab.

-22 degrees C with smoke!! Yikes, what kind of forcast is that??? Okay, you can dress for the cold, but do you need to take oxygen if you go outside?

Padma sounds like she's found the perfect home, especially since you found her in a children's playground, trying to make friends with a baby.

Christian: I didn't mean the evolution of species was attributable to karma. I was thinking about the individual sentient beings reborn in those ways.

Northmoon: Welcome to my world. "Smoke" figures frequently in our weather reports, a delightful mix of coal, wood, and who knows what else. I try not to go outside until a daytime breeze clears the air a bit.

Bizarre creatures indeed. I may not sleep tonight.

Ah, I understand now.

Well, I am not sure there is something special for sentient beings to be reborn as these animals. After all, they only seem weird to humans!

I was also kind of scared by the forecast of "Smoke."

(2nd attempt - apologies if this is a duplicate comment). I would like to make a donation to...whatever would be YOUR preference - critter rescue, student needs, veterinary services, and/or/etc. However, the "donate to the Mongolia Fund" button does not let me choose a Konchong-specific fund. Any suggestions (or specific requests) as to how I might accomplish this?

Konchog,
Did I tell you that we hatched a triops out of some sand I brought back from our trip to the Gobi? No wonder the agriculture guys don't want us bringing dirt home in our luggage. Who knew I had hitchhikers. Now if only I could have smuggled home a gerbil...

Jane: You're very kind, thank you. Best is just to drop your coins into the general Mongolia Fund and trust that I won't use too much of it on that Belize beach cabana I've had my eye on. If you click on the Garuda it takes you right to the specific Mongolia Fund donation page. "Konchog-specific" may be donated in the form of high-quality, dark roasted whole coffee beans.

Carol: Yes, you mentioned that. Still unbelievable.

Konchog: as per your preference, coins have been dropped into the general Mongolian Fund. Upon brief consideration, perhaps the Belize beach cabana might be an ideal location in which to contemplate attachment and impermanence. Or, if that is unfeasable, I do have a package of Hualalai 100% Kona and one of Harrar I would be delighted to share with any Monks who might enjoy a warm coffee moment.

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Mongolia Bird List: "L" = Lifer

  • Amur Falcon -- L
  • Arctic (Hoary) Redpoll -- L
  • Arctic Warbler -- L
  • Asian Brown Flycatcher -- L
  • Asian Dowitcher -- L
  • Asian Short-toed Lark -- L
  • Azure Tit -- L
  • Bank Swallow
  • Bar-headed Goose -- L
  • Barn Swallow
  • Bean Goose -- L
  • Black Grouse -- L
  • Black Stork -- L
  • Black Woodpecker -- L
  • Black-billed Magpie
  • Black-eared Kite -- L
  • Black-headed Gull -- L
  • Black-tailed Godwit -- L
  • Black-winged Stilt
  • Blyth's Pipit -- L
  • Bohemian Waxwing -- L
  • Booted Eagle -- L
  • Brown Shrike -- L
  • Carrion Crow
  • Chinese Penduline Tit -- L
  • Chukar -- L
  • Cinereous Vulture
  • Citrine Wagtail -- L
  • Coal Tit
  • Common Cuckoo
  • Common Goldeneye
  • Common Greenshank -- L
  • Common Kestrel
  • Common Merganser
  • Common Pochard -- L
  • Common Raven
  • Common Redpoll
  • Common Redshank -- L
  • Common Rosefinch -- L
  • Common Sandpiper
  • Common Shelduck -- L
  • Common Snipe -- L
  • Common Starling
  • Common Swift
  • Common Tern
  • Crested Lark -- L
  • Curlew Sandpiper -- L
  • Dark-throated Thrush -- L
  • Daurian Jackdaw -- L
  • Daurian Partridge -- L
  • Daurian Redstart -- L
  • Demoiselle Crane -- L
  • Desert Warbler -- L
  • Desert Wheatear -- L
  • Dusky Thrush -- L
  • Dusky Warbler -- L
  • Eared Grebe
  • Eurasian Bullfinch -- L
  • Eurasian Coot -- L
  • Eurasian Curlew -- L
  • Eurasian Griffon
  • Eurasian Hobby
  • Eurasian Jay
  • Eurasian Nutcracker -- L
  • Eurasian Nuthatch -- L
  • Eurasian Skylark
  • Eurasian Sparrowhawk
  • Eurasian Spoonbill -- L
  • Eurasian Three-toed Woodpecker -- L
  • Eurasian Tree Sparrow
  • Eurasian Treecreeper -- L
  • Eurasian Wigeon -- L
  • Eurasian Wryneck -- L
  • Eyebrowed Thrush -- L
  • Falcated Duck -- L
  • Fork-tailed Swift -- L
  • Gadwall
  • Garganey -- L
  • Godlewski's Bunting -- L
  • Goldcrest -- L
  • Golden Eagle
  • Gray Heron
  • Gray Wagtail -- L
  • Great Cormorant
  • Great Crested Grebe
  • Great Gray Shrike -- L
  • Great Spotted Woodpecker
  • Great Tit
  • Greater Short-toed Lark -- L
  • Greater Spotted Eagle -- L
  • Green Sandpiper -- L
  • Green-winged Teal
  • Greenish Warbler -- L
  • Hawfinch -- L
  • Hazel Grouse -- L
  • Hen/Northern Harrier
  • Herring Gull
  • Hill Pigeon -- L
  • Hoopoe
  • Horned Grebe
  • Horned Lark
  • House Sparrow
  • Isabelline Shrike -- L
  • Isabelline Wheatear -- L
  • Kentish (Snowy) Plover -- L
  • Lesser Spotted Woodpecker -- L
  • Lesser Whitethroat -- L
  • Little Bunting -- L
  • Little Owl -- L
  • Little Ringed Plover
  • Long-tailed Rosefinch
  • Long-tailed Tit
  • Long-toed Stint -- L
  • Mallard
  • Marsh Sandpiper
  • Meadow Bunting -- L
  • Mew Gull -- L
  • Mongolian Finch -- L
  • Mongolian Ground-jay -- L
  • Mongolian Lark -- L
  • Northern Lapwing -- L
  • Northern Pintail
  • Northern Shoveler
  • Northern Wheatear
  • Olive-backed Pipit -- L
  • Oriental Plover -- L
  • Oriental Reed Warbler -- L
  • Oriental Turtle Dove
  • Pacific Golden-plover -- L
  • Paddyfield Warbler -- L
  • Pallas' Reed Bunting -- L
  • Pallas's Leaf Warbler -- L
  • Pallas's Sandgrouse -- L
  • Peregrine Falcon
  • Pied Avocet -- L
  • Pied Wheatear -- L
  • Pine Bunting -- L
  • Pine Grosbeak -- L
  • Pintail Snipe -- L
  • Red (Common) Crossbill
  • Red-billed Chough -- L
  • Red-crested Pochard -- L
  • Red-flanked Bluetail -- L
  • Red-necked Grebe
  • Red-throated Flycatcher -- L
  • Richard's Pipit -- L
  • Rock Dove
  • Rock Sparrow -- L
  • Rook -- L
  • Ruddy Shelduck -- L
  • Ruddy Turnstone
  • Ruff -- L
  • Rufous-tailed Robin -- L
  • Saker Falcon -- L
  • Scaly Thrush -- L
  • Sharp-tailed Sandpiper -- L
  • Siberian Accentor -- L
  • Siberian Rubythroat -- L
  • Smew -- L
  • Spotted Flycatcher -- L
  • Spotted Redshank -- L
  • Steppe Eagle -- L
  • Swan Goose -- L
  • Temminck's Stint -- L
  • Thick-billed Warbler -- L
  • Tree Pipit -- L
  • Tufted Duck -- L
  • Twite -- L
  • Upland Buzzard -- L
  • Ural Owl -- L
  • Water Pipit -- L
  • White Wagtail
  • White-cheeked Starling -- L
  • White-naped Crane -- L
  • White-winged (Two-barred) Crossbill -- L
  • White-winged Scoter
  • White-winged Tern -- L
  • Whooper Swan -- L
  • Willow Tit -- L
  • Wood Sandpiper -- L
  • Yellow-billed Grosbeak -- L
  • Yellow-browed (Inornate) Warbler -- L